Growth vs. Entrepreneurial Mindset on Mindset Monday

Embrace your Inner Entrepreneur
We have looked at
fixed vs. growth mindset
employee vs. entrepreneur mindset
small business owner vs. entrepreneur mindset
We have looked at how you got limited beliefs
School
Family and Friends
Work
What can limit your beliefs
Intelligence test
Money beliefs
Work as taught in school
We looked at how to recognize your limiting beliefs
How to reframe your beliefs to be positive
Action to help create positive beliefs
Now we are looking at growth mindset vs. entrepreneurial mindset
There are differences
Growth mindset refers to a broader kind of mindset whereas the entrepreneur mindset is more specific.
However, the two share several common behaviors and characteristics.
Positivity: No matter what happens, an entrepreneur can frame it in a positive light
Learn from Failure: Entrepreneurs generally don’t achieve success on the first try.
Perseverance: Just like the growth mindset, a key characteristic of the entrepreneur mindset is perseverance
Delegate to Others: People with the entrepreneur mindset don’t try to do everything themselves
Love of Learning: The entrepreneur mindset loves to learn new things.
Intuitive: Entrepreneurs are risk-takers but these aren’t just random risks taken for no reason at all
Follow-Through: Entrepreneurs are always on the lookout for new opportunities
Flexible: One thing that the entrepreneur and growth mindsets have in common is that they are flexible
Non-Conformist: Entrepreneurs are not afraid to stand out and appear crazy to others.
Goal Setters: People with the entrepreneur mindset set goals as a way to push themselves forward
Good Company: Finally, entrepreneurs surround themselves with other entrepreneurs, positive influences, and like-minded souls
As you went over the above qualities of the entrepreneur mindset, where did you find yourself?
Did you feel that many of them applied to you?
Could you see areas where you can change or improve?

 

School can Limit your Mindset on Mindset Monday

Schools and workplaces are hierarchical.
Instruction and evaluation come from above.
Those in positions of authority have all the answers and know best.
We learn this chain of command from early on.
We also learn that questioning the status quo and challenging authority can land you in a great deal of trouble.
You need to Follow Rules.
This hierarchical system naturally requires rules and discipline.
A great deal of a child’s first few years at school involve learning how to sit, line-up, talk, behave, eat, and so on.
There is clearly a need to maintain order for management purposes, but we carry this reliance on rules into adulthood, where it doesn’t serve us so well.
You need to Learn and Then Do.
Tasks in school are given to children with instructions, examples, and demonstrations.
We read about concepts before applying them.
Learning starts with theory and ends with practice and actually doing something.
This is the opposite of the entrepreneurial mindset, which sees trying something as the first step, with the learning coming afterward.

Limiting Beliefs about Money and Work on Mindset Monday

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Another key area of life where limiting beliefs hurt entrepreneurs is money and finances. These ideas usually originate within the family through the things that parents say to their children.

Common limiting beliefs include things like:

“Money is the root of all evil”
“People with money cheated to get it”
“There is never enough money”
“You have to sacrifice if you want to buy (enter any item here)”
“We’ll never be able to retire”

These limiting beliefs express feelings of guilt, hopelessness, or scarcity about money. Obviously, these are feelings that are not useful for an entrepreneur.

Work

Early educational experiences can also play a part in shaping limiting beliefs about what ‘work’ is. The current education system in most countries focuses on learning whatever is needed to pass an exam. It doesn’t train children to become adult entrepreneurs, freelance workers, or small business owners. As society changes, there is a lag in the education system, which is still following the old model.

This old model involves working for a set period of time doing tasks assigned to you by a boss. For this work, you receive a check for an agreed-upon amount. Through obeying your boss, working hard, and producing value to the company, you may then be allowed a better position or higher pay.

This model fundamentally clashes with the entrepreneur mindset. In this model, workers are rewarded for obedience and their ability to minimize risk. Accepting risks and taking on challenges, however, are key to success as an entrepreneur.

What is the source of your Limiting Beliefs

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What is the source of your Limiting Beliefs on Mindset Monday
Limiting beliefs come from an actual place in your lifetime experience. Entrepreneurs often fail because they cling to limiting beliefs they’ve been conditioned to hold.

Limiting beliefs come from experience, and they can often come from very early life experience. They can even come from early childhood education. Generally speaking, society doesn’t raise children to become adults who think like entrepreneurs. In order to fit into society as adults, we are conditioned to think in more fixed mindset terms, especially as they relate to intelligence, money, and authority.

Your Inner Critic that you can learn to control on Mindset Monday

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Once you can recognize the inner critic, you can learn to control it. The way that you interpret challenges, obstacles, or criticism that you face is up to you. But this is the most challenging step for most people. It is difficult to reframe the voice when you have well-grooved patterns.
The way to think about reframing is to imagine giving advice to a friend.
Naturally, you would never use a harsh, critical voice when trying to help a friend.
If you would never do this with a friend, why are you doing it with yourself?
We are generally harsher on ourselves than we are with others, so instead of talking to yourself, imagine that you’re giving advice to a good friend.
Now, imagine that you’re giving them advice and reframe the negative statement that was made
After reframing comes action.
What challenges can you take on in order to foster and nurture a growth mindset?
What challenges have you been avoiding?
Choose a challenge and try it again, but this time, turn your fixed mindset around.
Find a work-related or personal task that you’ve either been shying away from doing or that you feel you’ve failed at.
For example, perhaps you always put work first and your eating habits are not the best. How can you challenge yourself to create better eating habits?
Maybe there is a skill you’ve been wanting to learn such as cooking but the idea of trying again gives you a sense of anxiety.
There might be an important client you’ve been meaning to contact but shying away from.
Start with one challenge, and you can then apply it to the next challenge once you have success with the first.

Reframe your Inner Critic on Mindset Monday

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Your “inner critic.”
You most likely know this voice, even though you may never have identified it as an “inner critic.” The first step is to identify that voice and identify the times when you hear it. These are situations where you are brought back to a fixed rather than a growth mindset.
To do this, you simply need to practice awareness. Start by identifying the voice when you hear it. Next, try to remember what event preceded those negative thoughts.
It’s a bit like trying to identify what is causing a stomach ache.
You have to go back and try to remember what you ate just before.
If you’re not sure you’ve identified your inner critic yet, try looking for cues. For example, look for times when you find that you’re doubting yourself, saying something like, “Can I really do this?” Or be aware of when you’re focusing on failure rather than success; for example, where you’re worrying about what will happen if you fail at something.
A good place to look for your fixed mindset voice is any time you’re trying something new or challenging. These are the most common situations where this negative voice arises.
Now let’s reframe these thoughts.
Once you can recognize the voice, you can learn to control it.
The way that you interpret challenges, obstacles, or criticism that you face is up to you. But this is the most challenging step for most people.
It is difficult to reframe the voice when you have well-grooved patterns.
The way to think about reframing is to imagine giving advice to a friend.
Naturally, you would never use a harsh, critical voice when trying to help a friend.
If you would never do this with a friend, why are you doing it with yourself?
We are generally harsher on ourselves than we are with others, so instead of talking to yourself, imagine that you’re giving advice to a good friend.
Take each statement that your inner voice gives you and imagine if it were a friend, your partner, or a family member who was saying it to themselves. Now, imagine that you’re giving them advice and reframe the negative statement that was made.
For example
“Are you sure you can do that? You don’t have the right skills to take that on.” BECOMES “I’m not sure I can do it, but I can learn with practice and effort. ”
“What if I fail? I’ll be a failure” BECOMES “All successful people have failures. I can learn from my failure.”
“She’s a natural at business. Besides, her family runs a business. I could never be as good as her.” BECOMES “She’s successful in her business, and I can learn from her.”
For example, some Intelligence examples
“I can’t do that. I’m not smart enough to take that on.” BECOMES “I’m not sure I can do it, but I can learn with practice and effort.”
“She’s a natural at business. Besides, she has an MBA. I could never be as good as her.” BECOMES “She’s successful in her business, and I can learn from her.”
After reframing comes action.
What challenges can you take on in order to foster and nurture a growth mindset?
What challenges have you been avoiding? More next week
To learn techniques to have a success mindset, go to http://jgtips.com/smindset.

How to tell the difference between your Inner Critic and actual thoughts.

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How to tell the difference between your Inner Critic and actual thoughts.
Your mindset and its beliefs can be totally unconscious.
It’s not always easy to identify them.
For many people, a negative mindset manifests itself as an “inner critic.”
This is an inner voice or private conversation that occurs in your mind
on continuous repeat mode behind your conscious thoughts
Excercise to become aware of your inner critic
Schedule 15-20 minutes today to do this exercise.
Make sure it is during a time when you have no distractions.
Close your eyes and imagine the type of life you’d love to have if anything were possible.
Does your ideal life include more vacations, more money, or better relationships?
Write down the characteristics of your ideal life.
For each characteristic, close your eyes and think about what each looks like for you. For example, if you have “financial freedom” as one characteristic, what does that actually mean for you?
Does that mean having your house paid for by the time you are 45?
Does that mean having your children’s schooling paid for?
Does that mean earning a six-figure salary?
Write these down.
As you are thinking about each of these, pay close attention to the thoughts that come. Are all your thoughts positive?
These could be thoughts like “I’ve got a steady pipeline of new business,
Or are there other intrusive thoughts that pop up?
These could be things like: “Yeah, right – incoming new business!
Who do you think you are?”
This is your inner critic speaking.
Write all of your positive and negative thoughts down.

The difference between a Small Business Owner Mindset and Entrepreneurial Mindset on Mindset Monoday

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Many small businesses operate under an employee mindset. If your goal as a small business owner is to grow, you need to think like an entrepreneur.A Entrepreneur has big ideas
SBOs solve local problems. They know their business and target audience.To develop your success mindset
go to http://jgtips.com/smindset.

Employee vs Entrepreneur Mindset on Mindset Monday

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Most entrepreneurs and small business owners started out their careers working for someone else. You might have had a career for 5 years or 50 years before you decided to start your own business. Or you may even be working for someone else even as you struggle to develop your own business in your spare time.

Working for someone else is fundamentally different from working for yourself.
There is an employee mindset
and an entrepreneur mindset and
they are markedly different.
If you have been working for many years for someone else,
you may not realize that there is a difference in mindset.
The longer you’ve worked as an employee,
the harder it is to change this mindset and start thinking like an entrepreneur. However, the employee mindset may not serve you well as a business owner.
In fact, it can work against you to guarantee that your business never reaches fruition.
As an employee, it is easy to blame others in an organization for responding too slowly, for missing opportunity
You are solely responsible for all things, good or bad. Entrepreneurs create something from nothing, with freedom to chart their path. You are the sole creator of that destiny.
As an employee, you were likely responsible for delivering tasks or accomplishing short-term goals, but you were likely not responsible for the long term goals of the company
As an entrepreneur, you have to focus on both short term and long term goals and vision at the same time
As an employee, you likely did not make decisions that had the biggest impact to your company’s bottom line. Also, you likely had a team of other people you worked with to make decisions.
Discomfort is the new reality. You don’t have all the answers, and you likely need to make quick decisions with very little input from others.
As an employee, you had a narrow scope in terms of your job. Any training you completed likely was directly related to your role
As an entrepreneur you have to wear many hats – project manager, sales, finance, marketing, IT, etc.
As an employee, you toed the line – following orders from above.
As an entrepreneur, you aren’t interested in the status quo. You always look for ways to improve.
These are some of the key differences between the employer and entrepreneur mindsets
Next week we look at the small business owner mindset versus the entrepreneur mindset.

There are some steps to a growth mindset

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There are some steps you can take to move you toward a more growth-oriented mindset
Step One – Awareness: Hear Your “Fixed Mindset” Voice
You most likely know this voice, even though you may never have identified it as an “inner critic.” The first step is to identify that voice and identify the times when you hear it.
These are situations where you are brought back to a fixed rather than a growth mindset.
To do this, you simply need to practice awareness.
Start by identifying the voice when you hear it.
Next, try to remember what event preceded those negative thoughts.
It’s a bit like trying to identify what is causing a stomach ache.
You have to go back and try to remember what you ate just before.
If you’re not sure you’ve identified your inner critic yet, try looking for cues.
For example, look for times when you find that you’re doubting yourself,
saying something like, “Can I really do this?”
Or be aware of when you’re focusing on failure rather than success;
for example, where you’re worrying about what will happen if you fail at something.
A good place to look for your fixed mindset voice is any time
you’re trying something new or challenging.
Step Two – Reframe
Once you can recognize the voice, you can learn to control it.
The way that you interpret challenges, obstacles, or criticism that you face is up to you. But this is the most challenging step for most people.
It is difficult to reframe the voice when you have well-grooved patterns.
The way to think about reframing is to imagine giving advice to a friend.
Naturally, you would never use a harsh, critical voice when trying to help a friend.
If you would never do this with a friend, why are you doing it with yourself?
We are generally harsher on ourselves than we are with others, so instead of talking to yourself, imagine that you’re giving advice to a good friend.
Take each statement that your inner voice gives you and imagine
if it were a friend, your partner, or a family member who was saying it to themselves. Now, imagine that you’re giving them advice and
reframe the negative statement that was made.
Skills examples
Fixed Are you sure you can do that?
Growth I’m not sure I can do it, but I can learn with practice and effort.
Fixed What if I fail? I’ll be a failure.
Growth All successful people have failures. I can learn from my failure.
Step Three – Action: Take on the Growth Mindset
After reframing comes action.
What challenges can you take on in order to foster and nurture a growth mindset?
What challenges have you been avoiding?
Choose a challenge and try it again, but this time, turn your fixed mindset around.
Find a work-related or personal task that you’ve either been shying away from doing or that you feel you’ve failed at.
For example, There might be an important client you’ve been meaning to contact but shying away from.
Start with one challenge, and
you can then apply it to the next challenge
once you have success with the first challenge.